Artist’s final sale continues education for women at U of L

BREEZE OFFERS DIRECT SERVICE TO OUT OF LOUISVILLE AND THE WORKS OFATE L LOUISVILLE ARTISTS ARE BEING SOLD FOR ONE FINAL TIME. RYMA CRAY-KAY DIED IN 2019 AT THE AGE OF 95 MORE THAN 100 PIESECF O HER FIBER ART VALUED AS MUCH AS $5,000 ARE BEING SOLD AT 75% OFF. SHE BEGAN A SCHOLARSHIP THAT HAS BENEFITED NEARLY 100 WOMEN AT UOFL THE PROCEEDS FROM TONIGHT’S SALE WILL ENSURE THOSE SCHOLARSHIPS CONTINUE. THE SCHOLARSHIPS ARE BASED ON HELPING YOUNG WOMEN THAT ARE GOING TO HELP WOMEN AND FAMILIES IN THE FUTURE AND THAT’S WTHA WE HAVE TO LOOK FOR IN THE SCHOLARSHIP. SO SOMEBODY TAKING A PIE HCEOME AND ENJOYING AND HAVING THE HAPPINESS OF ITND A THEN KNOWING WHAT AN ICON MARY WAS. YES, ABSOLUTELY JTUS FILLS MY HEART. ANY PIECE IS NOT SOLD W

Louisville artist’s estate sale continues support for women’s education at U of L

The works of a late Louisville artist have gone on sale for the last time. Educator, artist, and feminist Mary Craik died in 2019 at the age of 95. Now more than 100 pieces of her fiber art, valued for as much as $5,000, are being sold at 75% off. She began a scholarship program that has benefitted nearly 100 women at the University of Louisville. Proceeds from the sale will ensure the scholarships continue. Craik’s friend, Virginia Woodward, said, “The scholarships are based on helping young women and families in the future and that’s what we have to look for in the scholarship so somebody taking a piece home and having the happiness of it, and then knowing what an icon Mary was, it just fills my heart.”Any pieces not sold will eventually be given to the scholarship recipients.

The works of a late Louisville artist have gone on sale for the last time.

Educator, artist, and feminist Mary Craik died in 2019 at the age of 95.

Now more than 100 pieces of her fiber art, valued for as much as $5,000, are being sold at 75% off.

She began a scholarship program that has benefitted nearly 100 women at the University of Louisville.

Proceeds from the sale will ensure the scholarships continue.

Craik’s friend, Virginia Woodward, said, “The scholarships are based on helping young women and families in the future and that’s what we have to look for in the scholarship so somebody taking a piece home and having the happiness of it, and then knowing what an icon Mary was, it just fills my heart.”

Any pieces not sold will eventually be given to the scholarship recipients.

Anita Shire

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